Executive Position Job Order  |  Executive Candidate Registration
Global Executive Search Recruiting Firm

Management: Dealing With The Office Fridge, Part 2: Real Stories of Office Fridge Thievery
- Executive Leadership Articles

RMA - Global Executive Search Recruiting Firm Solutions - Executive Search Recruiting Solutions Career Center - Executive Search Resources For Employers & Job Seekers Employers & Hiring Professionals - RMA Is Your Source For Top Executive Candidates Job Seekers & Executive Candidates - Your New Career Begins Here! Industry Expertise - Executive Search Recruiting Expertise In 30 Industries Company - Over 20 Years of Executive Search Recruiting Experience News & Articles - Executive Search Recruiting News & Articles Contact RMA - The Trusted Executive Search Recruiting Firm
Your Source For Top Executive Candidates
News & Articles »
News & Articles
Executive Search Firm News
Executive Leadership Articles
Follow RMA On Google+
Follow RMA On Facebook
Follow RMA On Twitter
News & Articles - Executive Search Recruiting News & Articles
Management: Dealing With The Office Fridge, Part 2: Real Stories of Office Fridge Thievery - Executive Leadership Articles

Management: Dealing With The Office Fridge, Part 2: Real Stories of Office Fridge Thievery

Executive Leadership Articles

Management: Dealing With The Office Fridge, Part 2: Real Stories of Office Fridge Thievery

The sanctity of the office refrigerator is—and must always be—absolute. In the professional world where lunch is frequently the most looked-forward to event in the working day, it is practically a human right to expect that colleagues and coworkers will stick to the guidelines set by all our mothers: leave it alone if it’s not yours.

Yet every office seems to have a few horror stories about thievery from the office fridge. Slideshows on click-bait websites highlight the adventures of many office lunch thieves in hilarious stories of questionable veracity, tapping into a universalism rivaled only by the most popular Dilbert strips. We surveyed some Facebook friends for their tales of absconded scones and lunchnapped sandwiches, and people were eager to share. Among the more dastardly tales:

  • The teacher whose chicken Caesar salad was discovered at lunchtime to be just a Caesar salad: someone had eaten the chicken right off the top and returned the rest to the fridge.
  • The half-eaten burger wrapped carefully for later whose wrapper was found in the breakroom trash.
  • The drinker of half-consumed bottled drinks who continued this practice even after his or her coworkers spiked their drinks with large amounts of soy sauce as a way to teach a lesson.
  • The one dozen doughnuts whose thief didn’t even throw away the box, leaving it empty in the fridge.
  • The weirdo who took the lunch bag (a drawstring plastic bag bearing the logo of a popular electronics store) but left the lunch.

In follow-up conversations, some people admitted they didn’t really care to know who the thief was, because it meant that some trusted coworker would no longer be trustworthy. Some already had dim views of certain colleagues, and fantasized about nailing them in the act. Neither approach ever really solves anything, as stealing from the office fridge is clearly a widespread experience, and although lunch is a personal thing, it’s really just lunch we’re talking about here, the kind of thing most of us would gladly share if someone we worked with were really in need.

Some workplaces allow small, personal refrigerators for personal space, which is perhaps the ultimate weapon against the break room crook. Yet even these dorm-sized units are susceptible if their owners are the sort to leave things over night or through the weekend. Another popular (and inexpensive) way to fight back is simply to pack lunch in a thermal lunch bag and keep it in a desk drawer, leaving those who wish to fight over shelf space to continue to put their midday meals in jeopardy. A shrug of the shoulders and a repeating of the mantra “It’s just lunch” seems to be defense against losing ones cool if not against thievery itself.

A correspondent to an advice columnist some time ago documented how a coworker set up a hidden camera in the break room in order to nab the habitual office burglar, and while this can certainly be effective in identifying the thief, what are you supposed to do then? Sure, the stealing of a few bagels is not really the point: we’re talking about fomenting office discomfort and whatever the opposite of camaraderie is, a behavior that reeks of unprofessionalism at best. But what you’re really doing is engaging in a war on a battlefield that’s not worth the expenditure of resources. You can turn anything you want into a battle of wills, including the office supply closet, the repeated use of your personal tape dispenser by unwelcome parties, or the way you can hear what the woman in the next cubicle is listening to in her headphones, but then you’ll be fighting little wars all over the place, and your day is difficult enough without that. Our advice is to take a deep breath and choose: letting it roll off your back while continuing to use the community fridge, or spending a few bucks on some lunch bags and removing yourself from the fray.

 

RMA® Executive Search Recruiting Firm Locations:

 
United States & Canada:   Europe, Asia & Pacific:
 
  • Bangkok, Thailand
  • Beijing, China
  • Berlin, Germany
  • Hong Kong, China
  • Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • London, England
  • Madrid, Spain
  • Melbourne, Australia
  • Moscow, Russia
  • Mumbai, India
  • New Delhi, India
  • Paris, France
  • Prague, Czech Republic
  • Rome, Italy
  • Stockholm, Sweden
  • Sydney, Australia
  • Tokyo, Japan
  • Vienna, Austria
  • Wellington, New Zealand
  • Zurich, Switzerland
 
 

Management: Dealing With The Office Fridge, Part 2: Real Stories of Office Fridge Thievery - Executive Leadership Articles

RMA Executive Search Recruiting Firm  /  News & Articles  /  Articles  /  Management: Dealing With The Office Fridge, Part 2: Real Stories of Office Fridge Thievery




Start at the Career Center


News & Articles Links: