Executive Position Job Order  |  Executive Candidate Registration
Global Executive Search Recruiting Firm

Corporate Responsibility: Making CSR Part of Your Company Culture, Part 1
- Executive Leadership Articles

RMA - Global Executive Search Recruiting Firm Solutions - Executive Search Recruiting Solutions Career Center - Executive Search Resources For Employers & Job Seekers Employers & Hiring Professionals - RMA Is Your Source For Top Executive Candidates Job Seekers & Executive Candidates - Your New Career Begins Here! Industry Expertise - Executive Search Recruiting Expertise In 30 Industries Company - Over 20 Years of Executive Search Recruiting Experience News & Articles - Executive Search Recruiting News & Articles Contact RMA - The Trusted Executive Search Recruiting Firm
Your Source For Top Executive Candidates
News & Articles »
News & Articles
Executive Search Firm News
Executive Leadership Articles
Follow RMA On Google+
Follow RMA On Facebook
Follow RMA On Twitter
News & Articles - Executive Search Recruiting News & Articles
Corporate Responsibility: Making CSR Part of Your Company Culture, Part 1 - Executive Leadership Articles

Corporate Responsibility: Making CSR Part of Your Company Culture, Part 1

Executive Leadership Articles

Corporate Responsibility: Making CSR Part of Your Company Culture, Part 1

Bridges and Baseball Unis

We recently chatted with the CEO of an American civil engineering firm with projects throughout the Pacific, including islands in Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands. In some communities on these islands, the firm sponsors entire baseball leagues, providing equipment and uniforms for young athletes. In some of their schools, the firm has awarded iPads and scholarships for high-achieving students possibly headed for college. The CEO himself has produced web videos about the impact of sea-level rise on fishing communities and island life, writing scripts and shooting footage for his in-house media team to edit and share.

To B or Not to B?

When we asked him if he knew what B Corporations are, and whether he’d consider applying for B Corporation certification, he hesitated. His primary concern was that putting a big image on the company’s website touting itself as B Corp certified would send the wrong message. Attention shouldn’t be paid to the company for its contributions, he said, but on the communities whose young people would someday work on and use the runways and roadways his company engineered. These outreach efforts were partially an investment in communities (including governments) and partially an expression of gratitude for the work, a way of giving something back.

The firm’s company tagline isn’t about building, but about improving life in Pacific island communities, and while the engineers, marketers, media crew, and office assistants might sometimes not notice the emphasis on communities in this tagline, they certainly notice and understand the odd errands they are sometimes asked to run: pick up twelve baseball bats and twelve baseball mitts, and send them to this address in Majuro or Pohnpei or Guam. And throw in two dozen boxes of Girl Scout Cookies from the lady in the firm on the ninth floor if she’s still selling them.

Pushing a Message—of Caring

The leadership of this firm—which includes a social media manager whose Instagram posts seldom have anything to do with runoff or hangars, focusing instead on climate change measures and appreciating the everyday beauty of island living—by sheer force of sincerity and genuineness, defines a company culture felt throughout the firm. There are no weekend highway trash pickups, and there is no pressure on employees to contribute to a fundraiser. Rather, there is a sense that at any moment, someone may be asked to pause the work on grading a new development and (on company time) drive a large box of sports equipment to the post office.

The Cultural Trickledown

This is not to say that everyone sees these efforts in the most generous light. Some members of the team consider every community outreach strictly a long-term investment in public relations, or a blatant reach for quid pro quo from public officials who awards contracts and whose kids love baseball. But even the most cynical concede that whatever the motivations, the outcomes are admirable. If nothing else, employees have a feeling, trickled down from executive leadership, that their work makes lives better, and that their work contributes to communities, on public roads, airport runways, and baseball field runoff.

What company culture is your executive leadership nurturing by way of its actions and communications? Do your employees think CSR means getting together on a Saturday twice a year to pick up trash on a highway? If that’s the extent of it, it’s certainly a good start. But how can leadership communicate something deeper, perhaps the attitudes and sentiments driving the highway cleanup project? What assumptions (spoken or unspoken) do people lower on the org chart make about the company’s concern for the community, and what do they believe about the company’s response to a sense of social responsibility? We’ll consider popular advice in this realm in part 2 of this series.

 

RMA® Executive Search Recruiting Firm Locations:

 
United States & Canada:   Europe, Asia & Pacific:
 
  • Bangkok, Thailand
  • Beijing, China
  • Berlin, Germany
  • Hong Kong, China
  • Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • London, England
  • Madrid, Spain
  • Melbourne, Australia
  • Moscow, Russia
  • Mumbai, India
  • New Delhi, India
  • Paris, France
  • Prague, Czech Republic
  • Rome, Italy
  • Stockholm, Sweden
  • Sydney, Australia
  • Tokyo, Japan
  • Vienna, Austria
  • Wellington, New Zealand
  • Zurich, Switzerland
 
 

Corporate Responsibility: Making CSR Part of Your Company Culture, Part 1 - Executive Leadership Articles

RMA Executive Search Recruiting Firm  /  News & Articles  /  Articles  /  Corporate Responsibility: Making CSR Part of Your Company Culture, Part 1




Start at the Career Center


News & Articles Links: